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Crayola Product Line

 

Colored Crayon Tins


Sometimes it is hard to categorize Binney & Smith’s (Crayola) products.  Case in point with their various 8-color tins they produced over the years.  They weren’t just for the Crayola brand, they also put crayons from their other brands in them as well.  They don’t say “Crayola” on them.  They just say “Colored Crayons”.  Later they were referred to in their price list material as “No 88”. 

 

I wrote an article on them here:  Crayola 8 Count Tins:  A History.  But I’ll repeat some of the information in this section for completeness and use the format I use for all other product lines here instead.

 

Who originally used the hinged back tin for crayons is uncertain.  They can be found on many US and international company products going way back into the early 1900s.  The trend might have stemmed from other products being used with these containers.  Binney & Smith/Crayola certainly took advantage of this trend with their product lines.

 

The earliest reference to these tins that I could find was from 1919.  Inside you can find a number of different crayon brands.  I  have seen Crayola, Perma and even Cerata.  They seem to have several design waves over the years with several variations produced under these waves:  pre-red, red, and yellow/green.

 

The pre-red tins cover a range from around 1919 up through around 1947.  The red tins cover a range from 1948 to around 1963.  The Yellow/Green were used from around 1963 up to late 1960s.  After that they seemed to disappear; probably due to costs to make, sell and ship metal tins compared with paper boxes.

 

If you need a guide on the definition of the rareness ratings, go here:  Rarity Ratings

 

 

Colored Crayons (metallic tin Company) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0984      Start Date: 1919  End Date: 1921  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  7      Est. Value (Mint):  $30    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This version is a dull gold color with the larger Gold Medal insignia in the middle.  The major difference of this one from the next one in progression is that the “Company” is spelled out, not abbreviated.  It is unknown exactly what these contained and they may have contained any number of their product.

 

 

Colored Crayons (metallic tin) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0011      Start Date: 1922  End Date: 1927  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  7      Est. Value (Mint):  $30    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This version of the dull gold color abbreviated the "Company".  Everything else remains the same.

 

Colored Crayons (TM in yellow) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0418      Start Date: 1928  End Date: 1932  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  8      Est. Value (Mint):  $40    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the first black background tin and the Trade Mark is highlighted while the entire Gold Medal is gold.  This one is rarer than the later version and actually harder to find than the earlier dull gold tins.

 

Colored Crayons (TM) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0012      Start Date: 1932  End Date: 1937  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $20    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the second iteration of the black background tins.  They dropped the gold highlighting for Trade Mark but added some black between the actual gold medal and the ring arround it.  The lettering for the company name is much wider on this one too.  These are a bit more common than the earlier version.

 

 

Colored Crayons (City of Medford) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS1283      Start Date: 1936  End Date: 1936  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  7      Est. Value (Mint):  $30    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Although it doesn't say it on the tin, this was a contract tin that Binney & Smith did for the City of Medford.  It actually contained Crayola crayons whereas many of the tins contain either Rubens or Perma crayons.  A small find of these was made in the early 2000s.

 

Colored Drawing (black sides) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0410      Start Date: 1942  End Date: 1944  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  8      Est. Value (Mint):  $60    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was made during the WWII; which is surprising given the need for metal for the war effort.  As it stands, this one rarely shows up.  It is a transitional design that still carries a smaller just-outlined Gold Medal at the top.  This is also the first mention of "Drawing" crayons as opposed to just "Colored" crayons.

 

Colored Crayons (borders) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0467      Start Date: 1945  End Date: 1946  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $20    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the first version of the "borders" design where they utilized both horizontal and vertical striping.  The Gold Medal was phased out for this design.  This version did not carry the "Drawing" from the previous design.

 

Colored Crayons (Yellow with borders) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS2130      Start Date: 1946  End Date: 1947  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $20    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is nearly identical to its previous version with the exception of the "DRAWING" included.

 

Colored Drawing (Red Co. with usa) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0014      Start Date: 1947  End Date: 1950  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In 1947 they redesigned the tins to a red one and used a rough tri-striped chevron looking design.  They aren't exactly what is on the standard Crayola line but closely approximate those.  They brought back the Gold Medal insignia again, this time in white.  The company name was moved above the insignia.

 

Colored Drawing (Red Co.) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0013      Start Date: 1950  End Date: 1955  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

The change was minor for this one.  The prior version had the word "Colored" so high on the tin, the top of the "C" was cut off by the edge of the tin.  By removing the "Made in U.S.A." and dropping the design of everything so that the chevrons don't have their base, they better centered the design on the tin.

 

 

Colored Drawing (Red Inc no CP) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0786      Start Date: 1955  End Date: 1958  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

The only thing that changed for this version is the change from CO. to Inc. which they did to all their crayon containers in 1955.

 

Colored Drawing (Red Inc.) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0609      Start Date: 1958  End Date: 1963  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the last version of the red tin and the rarest of the red ones.  They added the CP certification logo in the lower left side and also added the Made in U.S.A. below the company and location.

 

Crayola No 88 (no stars) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0586      Start Date: 1956  End Date: 1959  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

At the same time, Crayola redesigned another tin to closer match their Crayola product line with the yellow and green.  These were referred to as the No 88.  I do not know if they ever associated that number with any of the earlier tins or not since they didn't put that number on the tins.  I have just made a guess as to which order they used.  Either they started with no directions on how to open them or they started with directions on both sides and gradually reduced those.  This first example has no instructions.  It is less common than the version with only one but not as rare as the version with both. 

 

 

Crayola No 88 (1 star) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0099      Start Date: 1960  End Date: 1964  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This version is the most common and has only one instruction for opening it via the left upper corner.

 

Crayola No 88 (2 stars) - 8 colors.jpg

 

 

BS0100      Start Date: 1965  End Date: 1969  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $15    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the last version and the rarest.  It has instructions on both upper corners.