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Crayola Product Line

 

Crayola Fabric Crayons


Binney & Smith developed a different kind of crayon for the fall of 1973 under their Crayola Craft brand.  I wouldn’t classify them as a special effect crayon, per say, but in essence they were formulated specifically to work with clothing materials.  Their initial offering came in the form of a kit used for transferring patterns and drawings onto clothing.

 

Coloring transference used with crayons went back to the 1910s and even Crayola had a part in that endeavor with their Art-Toy partnership.  However, clothing was a new one at that time.  Sure, there had been industrial marking crayons for decades that focused on marking specific materials and certainly tailor’s crayons were used for marking clothing but they didn’t come in a variety of colors and they weren’t used specifically as an art medium designed for clothing materials.

 

By November of 1973 all of the papers were announcing the new kit that allowed people to permanently transfer drawings and patterns onto their T-shirt or whatever clothing item they chose simply by using an iron with their patterns and crayons.

 


 

Inside the kit itself they had a uniquely designed box of 8-color fabric crayons.  For the first time, the normal colors of blue and red were on the Fabric crayon labels but they weren’t the standard true colors they used for their Crayola line of crayons.  No, these crayons had their own distinct true color (the color that lays down on paper or another material).  Suddenly there were two blue colors in the Crayola world.  One for Crayola crayons and one for Fabric crayons.

 


 

Even the color make up of their original Crayola Craft Fabric 8-color box was unique.  Never had an 8-color box shared burnt sienna, light blue and  magenta with their more traditional 8-color box colors such as blue, green, orange, violet and yellow.  Color naming conventions were also different.  Instead of their traditional violet (purple) they simply went with violet.  Eventually light blue was replaced by the more traditional black.

 


 

By the time the Crayola line was using their “Design through Creativity” logo, the Fabric line finally moved to wrappers that made them appear just like their standard ones although there were color differences in both the naming and clearly the true colors.

 

 


 

 


 

Of course, the Crayola craft line was more than just crayons.  There were many different kits not involving crayons.  However, the Fabric crayons were a big enough success that they moved away from the Crayola Craft line and into the Crayola crayon family as their own line of crayons.  Back before things were global across the world, each of their international headquarters had their own designs for Crayola Fabric boxes.  They continued to feature art boxes using Fabric crayons well after they went away from the Crayola Craft line.  Crayola was always trying the market with various art themed kits.  The regular Crayola Fabric crayon line continued to evolve; changing box designs and even wrapper and color assortments slightly.  And the line is still valid today which ever changing designs and colors. 

 

Another unique thing with the Fabric crayons that is unique among their crayon lines is that they allowed third party companies to partner with them in putting out Fabric crayon products using their crayons with the other company’s containers.  In some cases these identified Crayola but in others you could only tell through the clear plastic holder on the package.

 


 

One of the interesting observations of the Fabric line is that they have all been 8-color boxes.  Most of Crayola’s product lines expanded into more colors by offering larger boxes as well; either 16-color or 24-color options in addition to 8-color.  But the Fabric line has never delved into additional colors.  Perhaps since these are all unique true colors, the cost for formulate additional colors causes less incentive to expand with this line.

 

Let’s take a look at the line over the years.

 

If you need a guide on the definition of the rareness ratings, go here:  Rarity Ratings

 

 

 

 

BS1013     Start Date: 1973  End Date: 1975  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the original kit that debuted in the fall of 1973.  Inside the box was a unique new 8-color Fabric crayon box along with patterns for ironing onto clothes.

 

 

 

 

BS0060     Start Date: 1973  End Date: 1975  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the original Fabric crayon box.  Crayola didn’t choose to keep this design after this one-off box.  It is unlike any other crayon box they have put out.  A white box with a blue tab and a red crayon on the left.

 

 

 

 

BS0063      Start Date: 1979  End Date: 1981  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

I’m not positive if this was the next design or not.  There is a gap in years between the Craft Craft box and this one but they may not have had any fabric boxes offered in those first couple of interim years.  Time will tell.  This is one of the most vibrant of the designs with a multicolored flap and rainbow color fabric logo.  Crayola was using their wavy logo they had from 1979 through 1987.  There are three lines of text below the logo.  They also have the inches and centimeters; reminders of the failed effort to convert to metric in the USA back in the late 1970s when they put both measurements on products for a bit.  Notice also that they used “Fabric Colors”.  All subsequent designs drop the “Colors”

 

 

 

 

BS0477      Start Date: 1979  End Date: 1981  Country:  CAN

 

Rareness:  7      Est. Value (Mint):  $12    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Here’s the Canadian version of the previous USA version.  They used a rainbow hanger similar to the flap on the USA one.  They were still using trapezoid windows during this era in Canada and in Europe.  The Fabric logo is similar too but with French as required in Canada.  The Canadian Maple Leaf is at the bottom.  This version is one of the more valuable of the Fabric crayon line although none of them command much.  Canadian Fabric crayons have their own unique wrappers.  They colors are the same but there are some minor changes to the look such as using all caps for the color names where in the USA they were using all lower case.

 

 

 

 

BS2427      Start Date: 1980 End Date: 1982  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6   Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

After they finished with the Crayola Craft line, they simply moved on to specific kits under the main Crayola name.  This one is essentially the same as their original kit but with a new look.  During this time, many of their kits and larger boxes featured pictures of actual children playing with the materials.  Inside this contained the standard Crayola Fabric box of the era.

 

 

BS2428      Start Date: 1980 End Date: 1981  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6     Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Crayola didn’t do a lot of licensing but they did some.  In this case they went further with their color transfer kits and made a theme one for the movie Annie; a bit hit at the time.   Of course, the patterns were all Annie-inspired but the crayons were the standard Crayola Fabric box of the era.

 

 

 

 

BS0412      Start Date: 1982 End Date: 1984  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  8      Est. Value (Mint):  $8   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In Europe they also released Fabric crayons.  This is one of their earliest examples during the time they used their “wavy” logo.  As with many of the European examples, this one is very rare; only surfacing with a few examples to date.

 

 

 

 

BS2429      Start Date: 1986   End Date: 1988  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  7      Est. Value (Mint):  $8    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In Europe they moved to a hanger tab box and added a trapezoid window.  Their version of the fabric logo was white with green and yellow text.  They kept the “Transfer” reference underneath the logo; a tell-tale for early European boxes since the USA versions didn’t do that.

 

 

 

 

BS0283      Start Date: 1986 End Date: 1988  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons: 8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is another variation from Europe.  It’s fairly similar to the previous one with two exceptions.  First, it doesn’t have a hanger tab.  Europe was one of the only places that put out a box with a window and a back tuck flap without a hanger.  This time around they changed the window from a trapezoid to their more familiar half circle smile.  The rest remains the same.

 

 

 

 

BS0478      Start Date: 1988  End Date: 1989  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This introduced the pink fabric design and their DTC logo below.  There were 3 lines of text to the right of the 8 on the flap.  This was characteristic of several of their box designs for this era.

 

 

 

 

BS0828      Start Date: 1990  End Date: 1997  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This version used Crayola’s thick lettering and had 3 lines to the right of the 8 on the flap.  There have been a couple of new old stock finds of this version so there are a number of boxes out there in pristine condition.  This is the longest running box design and accordingly is fairly easy to find even if there weren’t all the finds.

 

 

 

 

BS1001      Start Date: 1990  End Date: 1991  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

One of the earliest of the third party fabric crayon assortments.  By this time, Crayola had moved to more generic labels which actually made it more confusing as they didn’t say anything about them being Fabric crayons.  Of course, the true colors don’t match those in the standard Crayola line so I would imagine if there were a bunch of loose crayons, it would be more difficult to figure out which were which.  In this assortment, as with all the third party assortments, the crayons are visible in the hanger package with the clear plastic holder.  This design had two kids characterized with colored clothing.

 

 

 

 

BS2430    Start Date: 1992   End Date: 1994  Country: USA

 

Rareness:  8      Est. Value (Mint):  $8    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Dritz was the primary partner Crayola used for Fabric crayons.  They did a number of variations.  This one has the Crayola as their thick text version.  This has the Dritz pin cushion logo above the Crayola.  As always, the crayons are visible.

 

 

 

 

BS2426      Start Date: 1995  End Date: 1996  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

For this assortment, Dritz moved their pin cushion logo further down to just above the crayon holder.  Text was in orange this time and the Crayola logo is still in the thick text of the day.

 

 

 

 

BS0629     Start Date: 1997  End Date: 1998  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is also a Dritz partnered assortment although it just mentions on Pyra Quilting in an oval logo. This one has purple at the very top and still uses the thick Crayola logo with the previous orange text.

 

 

 

 

BS0573      Start Date: 1998  End Date: 1998  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $2    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

With the new “Rainbow Underline” logo, they revamped the design a bit.  The text on the flap was now gone and the Fabric logo changed a bit from one color to more of a rainbow blended one.  There was more information at the bottom of the box.  This one is very common too.

 

 

BS0119      Start Date: 1998 End Date: 1999  Country:  Canada

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $2    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Dritz changed their assortment with the new underline logo for Crayola although they only went with a black colored one.  Their pin cushion logo was back at the top of the package.  It is during this time that Crayola went back to a Fabric wrapper for their crayons, thus eliminating the prior confusion with their standard line of colors.

 

 

 

 

BS0062      Start Date: 1999  End Date: 2002  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

The next design for the Fabric boxes was addition of a mock window on the front flap.  They dropped all the information at the bottom of the box and went back to just “Non-Toxic”

 

 

 

 

BS0874      Start Date: 1999  End Date: 2000  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

After the first year, they dropped the "NEW" from the box and also moved the "3 Colors in Every Crayon!" to the bottom, just up from the sizing text.  In its place, they added "Certified Non-Toxic" above the window.

 

 

 

 

BS2431      Start Date: 2000  End Date: 2001  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $4    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

I am assuming this is still a Dritz produced product under the name “Sewing Basket”.  Either way, it is a Crayola partnered assortment.  This one still used the underline logo but has a completely different design on the hanger.

 

 

 

 

BS2432      Start Date: 2002  End Date: 2004  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $4    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

I am assuming this is still a Dritz produced product under the name “Sewing Basket”.  Either way, it is a Crayola partnered assortment.  This one still used the underline logo but has a completely different design on the hanger.

 

 

 

 

BS0529      Start Date: 2003  End Date: 2008  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8  Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

For 2003 Crayola redesigned the Fabric box completely.  By this time they were using their “Smile” mock window design.  They also moved to a hanger tab box from this point on.  The Fabric logo was revamped making it more colorful and in line with what Crayola was doing with design at the time.

 

 

 

 

BS1206      Start Date: 2003  End Date: 2006  Country:  ASIA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $15    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In Japan they added a section in Japanese making this difficult to get for American collectors.  It ran for a while though not as long as the USA version.

 

 

 

 

BS2314      Start Date: 2008 End Date: 2008  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

When this came out in 2008, Crayola hadn’t done any art kit with the Fabric crayons for some time.  This one came out for Father’s Day.  It came with the current box for that time.  This was a short lived product and not that easy to find now.

 

 

 

BS1340      Start Date: 2009  End Date: 2016  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Crayola again redesigned the Fabric crayon box for 2016.  This time they dropped the Fabric logo completely and just stuck with large bubble text.  They added a blue T-Shirt with patters on it at the bottom.   The mock smile window was gone too although they still had mock crayons featured at the top of the box.  Oddly, the hanger tab had nothing on it.  They opted to use the “Rainbow Smile” logo.  They used this for a lot of other products where the smile window didn’t work.  This was another very long running design.

 

 

 

 

BS2156      Start Date: 2009  End Date: 2016  Country:  ASIA

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Again, Japan followed with the USA and designed their own Fabric crayon using Japanese.  Their version switched from a blue shirt to a white shirt and featured a bird on branches which was different than the USA version.  While this ran for a long time, it is a bit more difficult to get for American collectors.

 

 

 

 

BS2433      Start Date: 2016  End Date: 2019  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  7      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Crayola switched their design slightly in 2016 and moved back to a non-hanger box with a tan background.  They were still using the mock crayon rows at the top and still had the T-Shirt below but this time the T-Shirt was white.  I actually didn’t know this version existed until I wrote this article.  That happens sometimes when I do a detailed product line focus.  It is odd though that it is very hard to find a box of these.

 

 

 

 

BS2155      Start Date: 2019  End Date: Cur  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In 2019 they completely redesigned their Fabric box again.  It was such a complete change that they actually put “New” at the top of the hanger as they do with some of their brand new product lines.  I’ve never seen them do that with an existing product line before.  This time we have fanned crayons on the front.  It still uses the Rainbow Smile logo.  White a white box at the top and bright colors below, it marks a very different look.  Now I’m waiting for the version that removes the “New”…