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Crayola Product Line

 

Crayola Fluorescent and Neon Crayons


In the world of special effect crayons, Crayola’s Fluorescent crayons began the whole sub-genre.  The year was 1972 and for the very first time, Crayola created another crayon product line that used the Crayola brand name but was indeed a separate product.

 


 


 

The fluorescent crayons contain special pigments which “glow” under ultraviolet light.  Ultraviolet light is invisible to the human eye.  You can use something like a black-light bulb to produce UV of a frequency in the 3000-4000 angstrom range.  That has the most dramatic reaction with fluorescent materials and is called "longwave" UV.   UV lights are manufactured for a wide range of industrial and scientific applications such as medical, mineral and stamp recognition purposes.

 

There were actually several of Crayola’s colors in the past that had their own inherent fluorescent properties without formulating colors specifically for this purpose.  A couple examples are Yellow Green and Brilliant Rose; both of which glow under UV light; though not as strong as these new ones.

 

The first fluorescent boxes came in both regular and large size crayons but they both contained the following colors:  Chartreuse Fluorescent, Hot Magenta Fluorescent, Ultra Blue Fluorescent, Ultra Green Fluorescent, Ultra Orange Fluorescent, Ultra Pink Fluorescent, Ultra Red Fluorescent and Ultra Yellow Fluorescent

 

1972 Fluorescents

 

Looking at the color swatches laid down on regular white paper doesn’t give the impression of brilliant glowing colors.  In fact, they were difficult to lay down color as they were barely noticeable unless you happened to have a black light around to really see them glow.

 

Fluorescent (black wrappers)

 

The original crayons were put into a special black wrapper.  By 1973 they incorporated these eight new colors into the No. 72 by dropping the extra red, blue and blacks they had been filling in with.  This finally gave Crayola a true 72 color assortment box and their largest assortment in their history thus ending the fifteen year reign the No. 64 had with that honor.  In doing so, they redesigned the wrappers for these and so we had two different wrappers for a time.

 

Fluorescent (normal wrappers)

 

They didn’t bother to redesign a new No. 72 box but chose to place a red sticker advertising the new Fluorescent colors on it instead.

 


 

Things remained unchanged for the first three years.  Then in 1975, Crayola put out a Junior Art Kit under their new Crayola Craft product line.  The Crayola Craft line wasn’t just about crayons.  There were kits assembled with a multitude of art supplies and with various themes.  This was the first time though that the Fluorescents were used in an art set.  In 1976 they put out another kit, the Neon Art Kit that would mark the first time fluorescents were associated with the word Neon which they ultimately change the product line name to later on.  Currently, there are no actual kits that have surfaced to collectors.  And finally in 1977 they did a Crayola Craft Color-Me Place Settings kit that also had a box of fluorescents.  This last one ran long enough that later boxes carried the revised box design from 1979.

 


 

They also introduced a Jumbo size box in 1976 thus expanding the product line to two options. 

 


 

When Crayola numbered the fluorescent boxes they simply chose to use the standard Crayola line box numbers and then append an “F” for “Fuorescents” to the end.  These box identifiers were used before product codes and bar codes.  In the case of the Jumbo it was No 38F and in the case of the 8-color box is was No 8F.

 


 

By 1979 they changed the look of the box slightly and began to advertise the new box.  There was a prototype box they experimented with prior to expanding the banner design but it is unclear if that even made it to retail.  My guess is that it was just an idea they floated and happened to make a prototype which made it to the National Archives from their internal records.

 


 

For Christmas 1981 Crayola put out another assortment of art materials.  This time they called it Crayola Art Kit and it featured a box of fluorescent crayons along with other crayons and art material.  This kit too currently has no surviving examples that have surfaced.

 


 

The following year for Christmas, Crayola did another kit but this time they called it “The Crayola Box” and used an actual plastic container with handle so you could carry it around.  There were a couple design examples of this box so they must have sold it for a while.

 


 

The Crayola box wasn’t the only new item featuring fluorescents for the 1982 Christmas season.  They also put out one of their first “collector” tins with the retro canister tin.  It featured a regular box of 24-color Crayola along with a fluorescent box.

 


 

It wasn’t until the spring of 1985 that the fluorescent box got another redesign.  The jumbo fluorescents disappeared in 1985 because they changed the name to Large and sometimes didn’t even mention either.  As for the regular size fluorescents, after 13 years on the market, they were still the only special effect crayons on the market.  This would change in 1987 when Crayola Canada began experimenting with a couple of other special effects.

 


 

There was another redesign in 1986 as Crayola moved away from the trapezoid windows in the USA and started going with their “smile” window that was essentially the bottom half of a circle.  They were making these changed with all of their products by time time.

 


 

Finally, as the product line moved into the 1990s things were beginning to happen.  First, in 1990 they did their first “bundle” assortment.  By combining the No 64 box with a box of fluorescents, they sold a 72-color package.  This would be the same exact color assortment in their No 72 box which by this time had morphed into a crayon case to hold the crayons.

 


 

Then in 1990 they expanded the fluorescent line from 8 colors to 16 colors.  In doing so, they did a complete redesign of their box as well.  The ads came out in the beginning of 1991.  At first they promoted them with the “New” on the flap and then later dropped that.

 


 

In addition to expanding them, they also took the opportunity to rename the other original colors by giving them more descriptive names while dropping the “FLUORESCENT” reference from the name.  That made sense since they had been including them into standard assortments as far back as 1973 and this change brought a consistent look to the entire No. 72 assortment; their largest assortment size up to this point.

 

The newly redesigned called “Hot Fluorescents”, contained:  atomic tangerine, blizzard blue, electric lime, hot magenta, neon carrot, vivid watermelon, outrageous orange, magic mint, radical red, purple pizzazz, razzle dazzle rose, screamin’ green, shocking pink, unmellow yellow and laser lemon.

 

Hot Fluorescent crayons.jpg


 

The colors are difficult to scan into swatches so I’ll just give you the mapping:

 

Chartreuse FLUORESCENT became Laser Lemon

Hot Magenta FLUORESCENT became Razzle Dazzle Rose

Ultra Blue FLUORESCENT became Blizzard Blue

Ultra Green FLUORESCENT became Screamin’ Green

Ultra Orange FLUORESCENT became Outrageous Orange

Ultra Pink FLUORESCENT became Shocking Pink

Ultra Red FLUORESCENT became Wild Watermelon

Ultra Yellow FLUORESCENT became Atomic Tangerine

 

In addition, they added the following new colors:

 

Electric lime, Hot Magenta (I know, don’t confuse it with Hot Magenta FLUORESCENT from before, they don’t map the same), Magic Mint, Neon Carrot, Purple Pizzazz, Radical Red, Sunglow, Unmellow Yellow

 

By 1994 there was a fundamental shift from calling the line fluorescents to calling them neon.  The progression was complete.  They dropped the fluorescent reference on their wrappers first and finally on the boxes themselves.  From this point forward they would only be referred to as Neons.  In Europe they did not use the plural version, preferring to call them “Neon” instead.  This is actually proper as “neon” implies more than one as well as singular.

 

From 1994 until 2019 there were a number of box design changed that I feature in the line-up below.  I would imagine they have also been used in a number of larger assortments but by the 2000s they art assortments and bigger sized collections became so prolific that even I can’t be sure what container includes neon colors.  I know the Big Box, No 96, No 120 and the larger sized assortments all contained either fluorescent or neon crayons but given that there are so many, I opted to just feature the original 72 line before it moved from the original lid box to the plastic cases.

 

With the invention of Twistables, Crayola has used that to combine new technology with some of their product line crayons.  In 2003 they came out with a Twistables Neon line.  This seemed to last for a few years and then they either revived it or changed the design in 2014 and then again in 2016.  It’s so difficult to know when a product line is discontinued these days because the internet makes it easy to tap into existing inventories for years.

 

 

In 2014 they used Neon with their Dry Erase product line.  These were specially formulated for dry erase boards and the combination of Neon to that created a special focus crayon with special effects.  A very special crayon, indeed!  They ran these until 2018.

 


 

In 2017 they created a Neon version of their Oil Pastels too.  This one had a couple of unique colors:  Aqua Brite, Blue Bolt.  They also revived another color name that hadn’t been used since the Techno Brite boxes:  Graphic Green

 


 

The last big news was the revamp of many of the specialty product lines starting in 2019.  The Neon line got another major change with the expansion from 16 colors to 24 colors and a new set of names.  They did this for four of their product lines.  Also note that they switched over to the European version of using “Neon” not “Neons”.

  

http://www.crayoncollecting.com/ccolor44_files/image014.jpg

 

http://www.crayoncollecting.com/ccolor44_files/image016.jpg

 

http://www.crayoncollecting.com/ccolor44_files/image018.jpg

 The colors from this new 2019 box were:

 

Atomic Tangerine, Glitter Atomic Tangerine, Glitter Laser Lemon, Glitter Purple Pizzazz, Glitter Screamin’ Green, Glitter Shocking Pink, Glitter Sky Blue, Glitter Sunglow, Glitter Wild Watermelon, Laser Lemon, Pearl Atomic Tangerine, Pearl Laser Lemon, Pearl Purple Pizzazz, Pearl Screamin’ Green, Pearl Shocking Pink, Pearl Sky Blue, Pearl Sunglow, Pearl Wild Watermelon, Purple Pizzazz, Screamin’ Green, Shocking Pink, Sky Blue, Sunglow, Wild Watermelon

You can quickly see that what they have done is to take eight of the existing Neon color names and simply add glitter and pearl versions to each of them to create a 24-color “Neon” box.  This does give us 16 brand new Crayola color names that we have never seen before.  But it also gives us 15 new true colors because we haven’t seen them do specialty effects on other specialty crayons before.  The reason it is only 15 and not 16 is that they renamed Glitter Sky Blue from their Sky Blue with Gold Glitter color in their Glitter set.

 

That essentially brings us up to current day.  Let’s take a look at the line over the years.

 

If you need a guide on the definition of the rareness ratings, go here:  Rarity Ratings

 

 

 

 

BS0237     Start Date: 1972  End Date: 1979  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $15    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the original box that had its debut in 1972.  They used this design for a long time so it isn’t that rare.  It carried the strikingly visual neon colored flap to match the fluorescent logo banner.  They were still using the oval Binney & Smith logo back then.  The original versions had a neon pink banner with just “Fluorescent Colors” on it.  The second design expanded that banner. 

 

 

 

 

BS1164   Start Date: 1972   End Date: 1979  Country:  MEX

 

Rareness:  9    Est. Value (Mint):  $35    Crayons: 8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the Mexican version of the original USA box.  As far as I know there is only one surviving box of this that has ever surfaced.  Theoretically they had all the versions of fluorescents available as unique boxes in Mexico but since there are no surviving boxes and I know of no product catalogs to show them, only time will tell.

 

 

 

 

 

BS0202     Start Date: 1973  End Date: 1975  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  3  Est. Value (Mint):  $30    Crayons:  72   Colors:  72

 

What makes this unique:

This is exactly the same as the first white box design put out in 1967 except that this is when they removed the 8 repetitive colors from the set and put in the 8 fluorescent colors.  This gave the set a true 72 color palette.  The change was only the red oval sticker that indicated it now had the fluorescent colors in it.

 

 

 

 

BS2436     Start Date: 1975  End Date: 1977  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  8    Est. Value (Mint):  $40    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

As far as I know, this was the first Crayola Craft Kit to feature the fluorescent crayons.  You can clearly see from the photo of the inside of the art kit that it has the original box of fluorescents.

 

 

 

 

BS2434     Start Date: 1976  End Date: 1977  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  10    Est. Value (Mint):  $40    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This Neon Kit was one of the first batches of the Crayola Craft line of art material and themed kits.  It contained an 8-color fluorescent box.  It has the product line Crayola Craft guard on the left side of the box.  No examples of this box have ever surfaced.

 

 

 

 

BS2435    Start Date: 1976  End Date: 1979  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  8     Est. Value (Mint):  $20    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

After running with only the standard size fluorescents for 4 years, they expanded to include a jumbo size box as well.  These were the same size as the Crayola Large crayons.  They used the same wrappers and colors.  The Jumbo size came in two different boxes.  This was the front-tuck version which seems to be quite rare for some reason.

 

 

 

 

BS0724    Start Date: 1976  End Date: 1979  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5     Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the lid version of BS0480 above.  It is much more common to find for some reason.  Only the first edition boxes of say “Fluorescent Colors” in the banner.

 

 

 

 

BS1334   Start Date: 1976   End Date: 1979  Country:  MEX

 

Rareness:  10    Est. Value (Mint):  $35    Crayons: 8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the Mexican version of the original Jumbo USA box.  As far as I know there are no surviving boxes of this that have ever surfaced.  I found the picture in a catalog in the National Archives.  Theoretically they had all the versions of fluorescents available as unique boxes in Mexico but since there are no surviving boxes and I know of no product catalogs to show them, only time will tell.

 

 

 

 

BS0203      Start Date: 1976  End Date: 1979  Country:  USA

 

Rareness: 6   Est. Value (Mint):  $30   Crayons:  72   Colors:  72

 

What makes this unique:

After the white box versions, they redesigned and named the set to Color Drawing Set.  This was  the era when actual pictures of real children were used.  This one has a boy and girl shown coloring and you can see the crayons in their plastic holders in the picture.

 

 

 

 

BS2437    Start Date: 1977  End Date: 1980  Country:  USA

 

Rareness: 7   Est. Value (Mint):  $30   Crayons:  16   Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

Another Crayola Craft kit to come out, this time in 1977.  It ran long enough that you can also find it with the next design of the fluorescent boxes.  It contained both regular crayons and fluorescent crayons.  Again, this features two children with the set.  By this time they dropped the full guard logo on the left side of the cover in favor of a smaller one top left.

 

 

 

 

BS0402      Start Date: 1979 End Date: 1984  Country:  USA

 

Rareness: 7   Est. Value (Mint):  $40   Crayons:  72   Colors:  72

 

What makes this unique:

In 1979 as they were redesigning the actual fluorescent product line they also did another redesign of the No 72 box.  This time they called it a “Deluxe Crayon Set” and featured actual pictures of two older children this time but still showing all the crayons in their plastic holders.

 

 

 

 

BS1175     Start Date: 1979  End Date: 1979  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  10   Est. Value (Mint):  $40    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

I’m not sure if this made it into production.  It was at the National Archives and was either an idea or a failed attempt at the next design of the fluorescent boxes.  No examples have ever surfaced.  But if you look at it, it was likely their first attempt at the glows in the dark and they ultimately went back with the banner by expanding it even though the banner version barely fits the space available.

 

 

 

 

BS0993     Start Date: 1979  End Date: 1985  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $15    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the next box design for the Fluorescent line.  Perhaps they added the second line “Glow in Black Light” because many consumers just didn’t understand what fluorescent was.  This was at a time when black lights were a very popular pop culture item to have.   

 

 

 

 

BS0620   Start Date: 1979 End Date: 1985  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6   Est. Value (Mint):  $15    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the next box design for the jumbo size fluorescents.  There were three variations:  This one with the front flap, the lidded version and the same lidded version but sold opened with plastic sealing the inner contents.  Like the standard size, they added a second line to the fluorescent banner on the box.  These variations also mark the last version available for the jumbo sized crayons.  They morphed into calling them Large after that.

 

 

BS0480     Start Date: 1979 End Date: 1985  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6     Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the next box design for the jumbo size fluorescents.  There were three variations:  The one with the front flap (above), the lidded version (this one) and the same lidded version but sold opened with plastic sealing the inner contents (below).  Like the standard size, they added a second line to the fluorescent banner on the box.  These variations also mark the last version available for the jumbo sized crayons.  They morphed into calling them Large after that.

 

 

 

 

BS0829     Start Date: 1979 End Date: 1985  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5     Est. Value (Mint):  $15    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the next box design for the jumbo size fluorescents.  There were three variations:  The one with the front flap (above), the lidded version (above) and the same lidded version but sold opened with plastic sealing the inner contents (this one).  Like the standard size, they added a second line to the fluorescent banner on the box.  These variations also mark the last version available for the jumbo sized crayons.  They morphed into calling them Large after that.

.

 

 

 

 

BS1125     Start Date: 1979   End Date: 1985  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  10    Est. Value (Mint):  $35   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In Europe they would occasionally use other languages to sell in specific countries.  This wasn’t prolific and dwindled as time went on which makes some of the early ones quite rare.  There really isn’t the same interest in crayon collecting in Europe that I am aware of so their older products don’t surface much because they weren’t saved as nostalgia like they were in the USA where Crayola symbolized an American childhood.  This one has no actual surviving boxes that have surfaced; I found it as a catalog photo at the National Archives.  I would imagine that just like the Mexican and Canadian boxes, there are probably a lot that I don’t know about; time will tell if I can add to this history.

 

 

 

 

BS2438      Start Date: 1981 End Date: 1984  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  8      Est. Value (Mint):  $8   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In Europe they also released Fabric crayons.  This is one of their earliest examples during the time they used their “wavy” logo.  As with many of the European examples, this one is very rare; only surfacing with a few examples to date.

 

 

 

 

BS0065      Start Date: 1985  End Date: 1986  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is essentially the third true design in the line.  By this time Crayola had switched from their oval logo to their wavy logo.  Trapezoid windows were the big design thing at this time.  Europe used them far longer and more extensively but the USA did so for a time too.  By this time, Crayola didn’t feel the need to explain the Fluorescent anymore; they were established.  Besides, the black light craze of the 1970s had passed.

 

 

 

 

BS0236    Start Date: 1985  End Date: 1986  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

During the third redesign of the product line, the Jumbo version changed names to Large.  They didn’t make a big deal of it; choosing to put “Large” just under the 8 on the right of the trapezoid window.  As with the standard box, they still used the Wavy company logo.

 

 

 

 

BS0604   Start Date: 1985   End Date: 1985  Country: USA

 

Rareness:  5   Est. Value (Mint):  $5  Crayons:  3   Colors:  3

 

What makes this unique:

Crayola put out this sample size box in 1985.  I’m not sure what the specific purpose for it was but it contained three of the larger size fluorescents which by this time had changed names from Jumbo to Large.  They were still using their wavy company logo and had the thin Crayola font typical of the earlier years but still in use up to this point although things were changing to a thicker Crayola name.

 

 

 

BS2439  Start Date: 1985  End Date: 1986  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  10   Est. Value (Mint):  $25   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the second design I know of in Europe.  It’s the simplistic design companion of the USA trapezoid design.  For whatever reason, Europe didn’t run this for very long.  They seemed to keep redesigning their boxes separately from the USA and more often.  Like many of the European boxes, no examples have surfaced.

 

 

 

 

BS1173      Start Date: 1986 End Date: 1987  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  10   Est. Value (Mint):  $30    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the third design I know of in Europe.  It’s more desirable than the earlier banner with a non-English language and simples text version ones.  There are currently not any examples of this box.  This came from a catalog page.   What makes it unique is that instead of just text, Europe went their own way with the fluorescent line and replaced the banner with just this oval.  It didn’t run long though.

 

 

 

 

BS0719      Start Date: 1986  End Date: 1986  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $20    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

As the company moved temporarily to their “Design through Creativity” (DTC) logo, they redesigned the standard size box once again.  This time they went back to a pink oval Fluorescent logo and they switched from a trapezoid window to their initial smile logo which was really the bottom part of a circle.  This marks the first hanger tab box for the standard version.

 

 

 

 

BS0574     Start Date: 1986  End Date: 1987  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is essentiall BS0065 but with the wavy logo dropped. This came right after the DTC box which had a short run.  It is very similar to the Large version except for the Large indicator at the upper right.

 

 

 

 

BS0693     Start Date: 1986  End Date: 1987  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $7    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Like the standard version, this Large version just dropped the wavy company logo.  The 8 moved to just above the window but the Large designator stayed at the upper right.  This also marks the first hanger tab box for the large version.

 

 

 

 

BS0320      Start Date: 1987  End Date: 1987  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  8    Est. Value (Mint):  $50    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In 1987 Crayola put out a three box set called Imagination Station.  Each box contained 24 colors.  One was standard colors, one had Metallic colors and this one had Fluorescent colors.  Of course, only 8 of these are Fluorescent; the rest are standard colors.  This set is very rare for whatever reason.

 

 

 

 

BS1407   Start Date: 1988   End Date: 1990  Country: EUR

 

Rareness:  10   Est. Value (Mint):  $30  Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the fourth design from Europe.  They continued to highlight the Fluorescent on their designs.  This time they dropped the oval design for this jagged edge one.  I find it amusing that they put the 8 so high and left so little room for the Fluorescent logo.  As with the previous three, this uses the Wavy logo and a trapezoid window. 

 

 

 

BS0876     Start Date: 1987  End Date: 1991  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $10    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the last design before moving to the hot pink versions.  They went back to the trapezoid window and went with a jagged pink Fluorescent logo.  This looks like an older version but it doesn’t use the thin Crayola text; they were already using the thick text version and had dropped the DTC company logo and stopped using company logos going forward.  This is also another hanger box and they went to the pink as they had in the past with the pink tuck flaps.  These used to be rarer but there was a find of at least 24 unused boxes of these which drops the rarity and value.

 

 

 

 

BS1172  Start Date: 1990  End Date: 1991  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  10   Est. Value (Mint):  $30    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the last of the fluorescent boxes from Europe before they switched over to the “Hot” redesign in the USA and moved to Neon in Europe.    There were some changes here.  They moved to a pink Fluorescent banner and switched the trapezoid window to the one the USA mostly uses.  They were still using the Wavy logo even though the USA had moved from DTC to just a thick Crayola name.

 

 

BS1010    Start Date: 1990  End Date: 1991  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  10   Est. Value (Mint):  $30    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the last of the large fluorescent boxes from Europe before they switched over to the “Hot” redesign in the USA and moved to Neon in Europe.    There were some changes here.  They moved to a pink Fluorescent banner and a smile window as in the USA.  They dropped the wavy logo on this one.

 

 

 

 

BS2441    Start Date: 1990  End Date: 1990  Country:  USA

 

Rareness: 7   Est. Value (Mint):  $30   Crayons:  72   Colors:  72

 

What makes this unique:

Sometimes Crayola does special promotions.  I’m guessing they already had the new fluorescent changes in the works when this came out and so perhaps they were just using up inventory.  In any case, they would occasionally do “bundles” to promote something.

 

 

 

 

BS0748     Start Date: 1991  End Date: 1991  Country:  USA

 

Rareness: 5   Est. Value (Mint):  $10   Crayons:  16   Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

This was the debut expanded fluorescent size.  For the debut they had a banner in the upper right of the hanger that got removed the following year.  They stuck with a pink banner but made it wavy and added the “Hot” circle to the design.

 

 

 

 

BS0740      Start Date: 1991  End Date: 1994  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $7    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This was the 8-color version of the new redesign.  There was no banner for the 8-color because the new colors were in the new expanded 16-color box.  These were only renamed and the box redesigned.  It followed the same design as the 16 box.

 

 

 

 

BS0126      Start Date: 1992  End Date: 1994  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4   Est. Value (Mint):  $7   Crayons:  16   Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

This is the exact same design as the debut 16-color version except for the removal of the “New” banner in the upper right of the hanger.

 

 

 

 

BS0178    Start Date: 1993  End Date: 1993  Country:  USA

 

Rareness: 7  Est. Value (Mint):  $30   Crayons:  16  Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

In the 1990s Crayola put out several combined special effects assortments.   This Cosmic Colors came out in very briefly in 1993 and so it is rather rare.  Inside were 16 Gemtone colors and 16 Fluorescent colors.  There are no variations to this box; this was the only one.

 

 

 

 

BS0081      Start Date: 1994  End Date: 1998  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  3      Est. Value (Mint):  $2    Crayons:  8  Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

It was 1994 that Crayola changed the name of their fluorescent product line to “Neons”.  In doing so they completely redesigned the box.  This one had a colorful hanger.  They kept the smile window but redesigned a new logo using a triangle and circle.  They also added a purple layer to the chevrons.  These had been the usual dark green.

 

 

 

 

BS1080     Start Date: 1994  End Date: 1998  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4   Est. Value (Mint):  $7   Crayons:  16   Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

It was 1994 that Crayola changed the name of their fluorescent product line to “Neons”.  In doing so they completely redesigned the box.  This one had a colorful hanger.  They kept the smile window but redesigned a new logo using a triangle and circle.  They also added a purple layer to the chevrons.  These had been the usual dark green.

 

 

 

 

BS1258    Start Date: 1994  End Date: 1998  Country:  CAN

 

Rareness:  7  Est. Value (Mint):  $30   Crayons:  16   Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

While there are likely many earlier variations of the fluorescent boxes from Canada, this is the earliest version I know of.  It is at the time when the USA switched names and so I am assuming that Canada did the same and this is their debut box using the Neon name.  Canada and Europe did not use the plural version for their boxes.  They also added a blue Tippy to the box and the Canadian Maple leave.  The hanger was a unique black design.  This was an era before they were required to have French on all labeling as well as English.   I don’t know if they had an 8-color version of this or not.

 

 

 

 

BS1038    Start Date: 1994  End Date: 1998  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness: 10  Est. Value (Mint):  $40   Crayons:  16  Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

Here’s the first European Neon box in 16-colors.  I don’t know if they did an 8-color or not.  Like Canada, they chose not to use the plural version.  Their first box kept a pink hanger similar to many of the early boxes from the fluorescent versions.  This time the uses a two level arched banner for the Neon logo.

 

 

 

 

 

BS0886    Start Date: 1994  End Date: 1994  Country:  USA

 

Rareness: 7  Est. Value (Mint):  $30   Crayons:  16  Colors:  16

 

What makes this unique:

In the 1990s Crayola put out several combined special effects assortments.   This Glitter and Neons came out in very briefly in 1994 and so it is rather rare.  Inside were 8 Glitter colors and 8 Neon colors.  There are no variations to this box; this was the only one.

 

 

 

 

 

BS1017   Start Date: 1995  End Date: 1997  Country:  AUS

 

Rareness:  6  Est. Value (Mint):  $20   Crayons:  48   Colors:  48

 

What makes this unique:

This Australian crayon caddy (they called them carrousels), they included 8 Neon colors.  It’s an odd combination because that meant 40 other colors.  That’s not a number normally assembled.  I have no idea what combination of colors were used.

 

 

 

 

BS0241    Start Date: 1998  End Date: 2000  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Crayola did a fundamental shift from just a thick text Crayola name to using their “rainbow underline” design.  This was the box they used to change to that in 1998.  To fit it, they had to reduce the size of the Neons design.

 

 

 

BS0764    Start Date: 1998  End Date: 2000  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4     Est. Value (Mint):  $5   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Crayola did a fundamental shift from just a thick text Crayola name to using their “rainbow underline” design.  This was their Large size crayons in a box they didn’t identify as such. To fit the new logo, they had to reduce the size of the Neons design.

 

 

 

BS0082     Start Date: 2000  End Date: 2002  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $3    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In 2000 Crayola did another design change for their box.  They dropped the triangle circle design and replaced it with a bubble text Neons.  They were still using the rainbow underline Crayola logo and the original smile/half circle window.  The moved to a green hanger.  Oddly, there were no 16-color versions of this.  I don’t know if they just discontinued the 16-color size but no other design change featured a 16-color version.

 

 

 

 

BS1343      Start Date: 2002  End Date: 2005  Country:  EUR

 

Rareness:  9      Est. Value (Mint):  $20    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Europe redesigned their Neon boxes too.  They used an art easel style logo and switched to the Rainbow smile mock window with more current bubble Crayola lettering and a large 8 which was popular to use during this era.  Again, why there was no 16-color is a mystery.

 

 

 

BS1054      Start Date: 2003  End Date: 2004  Country:  CAN

 

Rareness:  6      Est. Value (Mint):  $7    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

From Canada, this is the debut of the neon line of Twistables.  It has both English and French but very small at the top.  Being from Canada, this is more difficult to find now.  It utilizes the rainbow smile and the twisting crayon at lower left.  The 8 for this variation is at the bottom.

 

 

 

BS1014      Start Date: 2003  End Date: 2005  Country:  CAN

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the debut USA version.  This one has the 8 above and there is a green band at the top of the sleeve that the Canadian version doesn’t have.

 

 

 

BS1837      Start Date: 2004  End Date: 2005  Country:  AUS

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $7   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is the debut in Australia.  They had a different look which was similar to the UK type easel logo for Neon.  They didn’t use the twisting crayon at the bottom and the container was a paper hanger at the top.

 

 

 

BS1852      Start Date: 2006  End Date: 2007  Country:  AUG

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $7   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Australia had their own “New Look” design in 2006.  They used the arching logo but in a different color and their window wasn’t the arching one of the USA, it was unique.  The added a purple tip at the bottom and the 8 is in purple, not red.

 

 

 

BS1297      Start Date: 2005  End Date: 2005  Country:  CAN

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $3   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In 2005 they revised the look and even pointed that out in the upper left of the plastic case.  This design utilized an arching window at the bottom and the neon got moved to the upper right of the sleeve.  The Twistables logo changed to an arch as well and the 8 dropped to the lower right with a purple tip.

 

 

 

BS2442      Start Date: 2006  End Date: 2007  Country:  CAN

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $3   Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

This is essentially the same design as BS1297 but they dropped the “New Look” for this one in 2006.

 

 

 

BS1584      Start Date: 2014  End Date: 2014  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  4      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  4   Colors:  4

 

What makes this unique:

In 2014 Crayola did a few different product lines a sample size products.  Neon crayons were one of the ones they used.  This box has a unique look that incorporates the Hungry Hungry Caterpillar design from Eric Carle’s famous children’s book.

 

 

 

BS1584      Start Date: 2014  End Date: 2015 Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $2    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In 2014 Crayola used Neon for their Dry Erase crayons.  This is essentially putting together a special purpose crayon with a special effect crayon.  Looking at the crayons, they looked just like Neon crayons and colors but with a black wrapper.  This particular box has the “New” in the upper left corner for the launch.

 

 

 

BS1584      Start Date: 2014  End Date: 2015 Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $2    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

In 2014 Crayola used Neon for their Dry Erase crayons.  This is essentially putting together a special purpose crayon with a special effect crayon.  Looking at the crayons, they looked just like Neon crayons and colors but with a black wrapper.  This particular box has the “New” in the upper left corner for the launch.  I am not sure why they launched two different designs but they did.  Perhaps this one was eliminated because it looks more like a chalk board than a dry board.

 

 

 

 

BS1913      Start Date: 2015  End Date: 2015  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  5      Est. Value (Mint):  $5    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

Crayola began tinkering with different special effect crayons in 2015 and did these very colorful versions of a few.  This time they didn’t pluralize the word Neon for the first time.  Again, they only featured an 8-color version of this.

 

 

 

 

BS1734      Start Date: 2016  End Date: 2018 Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2      Est. Value (Mint):  $2    Crayons:  8   Colors:  8

 

What makes this unique:

By 2016 the Dry Erase Neon boxes weren’t “New” anymore and so they removed that from the box.  Their Dry Erase Neon crayons is essentially putting together a special purpose crayon with a special effect crayon.  Looking at the crayons, they looked just like Neon crayons and colors but with a black wrapper. 

 

 

 

BS2009     Start Date: 2017  End Date: Cur  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2   Est. Value (Mint):  $2   Crayons:  12   Colors:  12

 

What makes this unique:

In 2017, a Neon set was added to the Oil Pastels product line.  Technically, Oil Pastels are crayons although they look different than normal Crayola crayons.  They have their own wrapper and shapes.  And in the case of this box, they have a few unique crayons colors as well.  They only did this one version of the box.

 

 

 

BS2205     Start Date: 2019  End Date: Cur  Country:  USA

 

Rareness:  2   Est. Value (Mint):  $7   Crayons:  24   Colors:  24

 

What makes this unique:

In 2019 they did a complete revamp of four different special effect crayons and revived Neon crayons by expanding them to 24 colors.  They put out a new box with a mock smil window, crayon tips on both the hanger and bottom of the box.  Inside were new wrappers and new colors.