ccheader.tif

homesmall.tifcrayolasmall.tifcompaniessmall.tifarticlessmall.tif

 

The Definitive History of the Colors of Crayola

Part 19 – Decade of Experimentation

 

This is a multi-part series of articles written to tell the tale of the history of color names for Crayola. 

You can visit earlier parts here: Part 1 - In the Beginning there was..., Part 2 - The Original Color Line Up, Part 3 - Other Color Names, Part 4 - The Gold Medal Changeover, Part 5 - Dwindling Down, Part 6 - Changes in the Roaring 20s, Part 7 - Crayola Color Wheel, Part 8 - New Assortments Equals New Color Changes, Part 9 - Crayola's Biggest Assortment Secret, Part 10 - War Time Changes, Part 11 - Enter the No. 48, Part 12 - The 50s, Part 13 - The Revolutionary No. 64, Part 14 - The Consistent Years, Part 15 - Specialty Crayons, Part 16 - Fun Alternative Color Names, Part 17 - Heavy Metal, Part 18 - More So Big

 

Retirement

 

As the new decade unfolded, Crayola decided to once again change out some of their primary colors.  So in 1990, instead of just doing it with no explanation, they embarked on a more radical idea:  promote it!  Wanting to swap out eight colors, they put forth a marketing campaign to announce the fact by focusing on the eight colors that were going away.  The notion of “retiring” the colors generated a lot of publicity both positive and negative.  There were dedicated consumers supporting to keep their favorite color from being officially retired.  Suddenly, instead of doing it on the sly and leaving their consumers scratching their heads or not even noticing, Crayola had the attention of the nation.  The interesting thing was that while some folks thought their retirement concept outrageous, they didn’t realize that Crayola had been changing their colors over their entire history but just not announcing it which perhaps does support the notion that “ignorance is bliss.”

 

The following colors were “officially” retired:

Blue Gray – This color was only introduced in 1958 with the introduction of the No. 64 but a shame it went away as there weren’t any colors close to that particular shade.

Green Blue - This color was also introduced in 1958.  The color was very close to Blue so the loss wasn’t a big blow.

Lemon Yellow – This color went all the way back to the original 1903 start having started as the original Yellow before being used as Light Yellow and then finally getting used for Lemon Yellow.  The loss was minimal as others are close.  Strangely it did survive on as Fire Fly Yellow in the second So Big assortment.

Maize – This was also an original true color from 1903 having started both as Golden Ochre and Gold Ochre before being renamed in 1958.  As Goldenrod is similar in shade, this wasn’t a traumatic loss.

Raw Umber – Another original color from 1903, this one didn’t have any comparable shade to replace it.  There was even a RUMP group formed to save the color!

Orange Red – This was another 1958 color and it looked like Crayola was slowly phasing out of their “two color” naming conventions.

Orange Yellow – Here was another 1958 color that wasn’t a huge loss as other colors were similar in shade.

Violet Blue – This was yet another 1958 combo-color eliminated.  There wasn’t a real close color shade to fill in but then again some other colors weren’t that far off either.

 

1990 colors retired and newOf course, when they retired eight they had to add eight.  They added:

 

Cerulean

Dandelion

Fuchsia

Jungle Green

Royal Purple

Teal Blue

Vivid Tangerine

Wild Strawberry

 

The new eight colors weren’t mere renames.  These were new legitimate true colors to the list.  Or were they?

 

One of the things I’d noticed right away was that over the years, the apparent color (the color you see when you look at the crayon) has really been enhanced from the earlier years.  When I actually color with them though, there are some that don’t come even close to that color on paper.  For whatever reason, the true color has become more and more off from the apparent color.

NewColors.jpg

Crayola No 64 (8 new colors) - 64 colors.jpgVivid Tangerine and Jungle Green were the two new colors that made me consider that.  Jungle Green looks very green to the eye but after I colored with it, it seemed like yet another turquoise-like shade.   Now I’ve been in Amazon jungle before and I don’t really remember a lot of turquoise there.  Perhaps I just haven’t seen enough jungles.  And coloring with Vivid Tangerine and its lackluster yellowish look, I’d say it was anything BUT vivid.  Perhaps I had a poor pigment crayon though.

 

Of course, this wasn’t the end of the story.  Before they got proper wrappers with names, Crayola had to promote the fact that they had new colors.  They did this both on the No. 64 box and the crayon wrappers themselves.  These were only out for a short time before they switched them to the normal wrapper.  Since it didn’t really change the color list in any way, I didn’t notate the fact that these had “New Color” listed on part of their crayon wrappers although completists will want these variations too.

 

Still, knowing Crayola’s penchant for reusing true colors of old, I had to compare these new colors to see if any were actually new.

 

1990 New color comparison.jpg

 

As you can see, Vivid Tangerine has a really week pale orange that doesn’t really fit close to anything they had done before.  It did look vivid to the eye but not on paper.  Still, it was a unique true color.  Dandelion also seemed to fit into the sea of yellow hues used throughout their history.  The hue wasn’t very distinguishable when on paper but at there was a minor difference.  Jungle Green came out more blue with the scan than the actual swatch was and there wasn’t anything in that color range to compare with.  Teal Blue did the same thing; it fit in between a myriad of former Cerulean and Turquoise Blue colors coming very close to Light Turquoise Blue but ultimately not the same.  Wild Strawberry didn’t have anything similar.  Fuchsia was yet another drop in a vast ocean of similar colors used in the past but really…who can honestly tell if it was a reuse.  I’ll leave it as unique since all of the other colors clearly were.

 

So, for the first time since the swap out of Flesh to Peach in 1962, the assortment colors for the No. 48 and No. 64 were different. 

 

With the change, the No. 48 contained:  apricot, bittersweet, black, blue, blue green, blue violet, brick red, brown, burnt sienna, carnation pink, cerulean, cornflower, dandelion,  fuchsia, gold, gray, green, green yellow, jungle green, magenta, mahogany, maroon, melon, midnight blue, olive green, orange, orchid, peach, periwinkle, pine green, red, red orange, red violet, salmon, sea green, silver, spring green, tan, teal blue, thistle, turquoise blue, violet, violet red, vivid tangerine, white, yellow, yellow green, yellow orange

 

Crayola No 64 (fat mock 3 lines right) - 64 colors.jpgCrayola No 64 (fat mock non toxic right) - 64 colors.gifWith the change, the No. 64 contained:  apricot, aquamarine, bittersweet, black, blue, blue green, blue violet, brick red, brown, burnt orange, burnt sienna, cadet blue, carnation pink, copper, cornflower, dandelion, forest green, fuchsia, gold, goldenrod, gray, green, green yellow, indian red, jungle green, lavender, magenta, mahogany, maroon, melon, midnight blue, mulberry, navy blue, olive green, orange, orchid, peach, periwinkle, pine green, plum, raw sienna, red, red orange, red violet, royal purple, salmon, sea green, sepia, sky blue, silver, spring green, tan, teal blue, thistle, turquoise blue, violet, violet red, vivid tangerine, white, wild strawberry, yellow, yellow green, yellow orange

 

 

Crayola 72 Crayon Case (yellow case pic) - 72 colors.jpgThere was little fan fare in the change of colors from the design of the assortment boxes.  They merely changed a minor few things on the outside and had no announcement from the front to indicate that colors were being retired.

 

For their biggest assortment, by this time Crayola had evolved the No. 72 from a lift lid box to a carry case.  The assortment still contained all of the No. 64 colors along with the original eight fluorescent crayons.

 

 

 

More Fluorescents

 

Crayola Fluorescent (Hot New on Hanger) - 16 colors.jpg1990 was also the year they expanded their fluorescent line to include another eight colors.  In addition to expanding them, they also took the opportunity to rename the other original colors by giving them more descriptive names while dropping the “FLUORESCENT” reference from the name.  That made sense since they had been including them into standard assortments as far back as 1973 and this change brought a consistent look to the entire No. 72 assortment; their largest assortment size up to this point.

 

They redesigned a new box called “Hot Fluorescents” that was a full sixteen assortment size and contained:  atomic tangerine, blizzard blue, electric lime, hot magenta, neon carrot, vivid watermelon, outrageous orange, magic mint, radical red, purple pizzazz, razzle dazzle rose, screamin’ green, shocking pink, unmellow yellow and Hot Fluorescent crayons.jpglaser lemon.

 

The colors are difficult to scan into swatches so I’ll just give you the mapping:

 

Chartreuse FLUORESCENT became Laser Lemon

Hot Magenta FLUORESCENT became Razzle Dazzle Rose

Ultra Blue FLUORESCENT became Blizzard Blue

Ultra Green FLUORESCENT became Screamin’ Green

Ultra Orange FLUORESCENT became Outrageous Orange

Ultra Pink FLUORESCENT became Shocking Pink

Ultra Red FLUORESCENT became Wild Watermelon

Ultra Yellow FLUORESCENT became Atomic Tangerine

 

In addition, they added the following new colors

 

Electric lime, Hot Magenta (I know, don’t confuse it with Hot Magenta FLUORESCENT from before, they don’t map the same), Magic Mint, Neon Carrot, Purple Pizzazz, Radical Red, Sunglow, Unmellow Yellow

 

Silver Swirls

 

As if that wasn’t enough to roll out or change, Crayola also introduced yet another new specialty crayon assortment with new colors:  Silver Swirls.

 

These were colors that provided a shiny luster to them and were marketed toward the older children.

 

They came out with three different assortment sizes, 8, 16 and 24 colors.  Since these were named crayons, the most desirable was obviously the 24 color box.  It also happened to become more difficult to find years later.

 

Crayola Silver Swirls (New) - 8 colors.jpgCrayola Silver Swirls (New) - 16 colors.jpgCrayola Silver Swirls (New) - 24 colors.jpg

 

The Silver Swirl colors were: 

 

Aztec Gold, Burnished Brown, Cerulean Frost, Cinnamon Satin, Copper Penny, Cosmic Cobalt, Glossy Grape, Granite Gray, Green Sheen, Lilac Luster, Misty Moss, Mystic Maroon, Pearly Purple, Pewter Blue, Polished Pine, Quick Silver, Rose Dust, Rusty Red, Shadow Blue, Shiny Shamrock, Steel Teal, Sugar Plum, Twilight Lavender, Wintergreen Dream

 

Silver Swirls crayons.jpg

 

In addition to new names, new wrappers and new assortment boxes they also had new true colors:

 

Silver Swirls.jpg

 

Actually, there were two that did not.  Copper Penny was just another name for Copper which we saw in the 1987 Canadian Metallic assortment.  Aztec Gold was the same name and color from that same assortment.

 

UK Fluorescent Colors 1990.jpgInternational

 

Another change in this decade is that we began to see more independent differences coming out of their European, Mexican and Canadian locations.  The first indication that each manufacturing plant made some of their own decisions came from Canada when they did their own Gemtone and Metallic lines and colors.  This time we had some slight differences in Europe with the fluorescent renames. 

 

Instead of Hot Magenta, they changed it to Magic Magenta.  Electric Lime became Electric Green, Magic Mint was Peppermint Green, Neon Carrot was Fiery Orange and Purple Pizzazz got renamed Powerful Purple.  They didn’t bother to change Radical Red, Sunglow or Unmellow Yellow though.  The other eight weren’t swapped out right away.  Apparently Europe was also slow to change out all of their fluorescents and even by late 1993 they were still carrying the original eight names.

Mexican crayon colors.jpg

In Mexico, they finally moved from all Spanish names to English names and in doing so, introduced a number of colors to the line that had differences.  A few of their core colors reintroduced variations that hadn’t been used in years:  Pink for Carnation Pink, Purple for Violet (Purple) and oddly Violet which they used for the color Blue Violet.  Nowhere else would one find both Violet and Purple in the same assortment and as different true colors.

 

Several of the new colors introduced were given different names.  Wild Strawberry dropped the ‘Wild’ and just became Strawberry.  Dandelion was renamed as Carrot.  Cerulean was renamed Aqua Blue.  Perhaps the word Cerulean didn’t translate well.

 

Other older color names were also given different names.  Forest Green became Grass Green; an interesting twist of a name as one would expect to see the color name as “Green Grass” instead.  They did switch that color name years later.  Orange Red became Apple Red, Red Orange was Mandarine Orange and Yellow Orange was Pineapple Yellow.  Of course, their interpretation on the spelling of Mandarin was different than that of the USA (they added an ‘e’ at the end.)

 

Mexico color comparison 1990

 

Though Crayola introduced a lot of changes and products from all over their global locations in 1990, this was just the beginning of a decade of experimentation with marketing their product in new and interesting ways.

 

For the purposes of our color history, at the end of 1990 we had the largest impact since the big 1958 change over with the following changes:

 

Apple Red was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Orange Red

Aqua Blue was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Cerulean

Atomic Tangerine was a new named color but its true color came from Ultra Yellow FLUORESCENT

Aztec Gold had the same name and true color as that of the one in the Canadian Metallic set

Blizzard Blue was a new named color but its true color came from Ultra Blue FLUORESCENT

Blue Gray was officially retired

Blue Purple was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Violet Blue

Burnished Brown was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Carrot was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Dandelion

Cerulean was a new name and true color (although they used Cerulean Blue from 1949 to 1958) that was also named Aqua Blue in Mexico

Cerulean Frost was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Chartreuse FLUORESCENT was officially renamed in the USA as Laser Lemon but this named color continued to be used in Europe

Cinnamon Satin was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Copper Penny was a new name but its true color came from the Copper in the Canadian Metallic set

Cosmic Cobalt was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Dandelion was a new name and true color that was also name Carrot in Mexico

Electric Green was a new name used only in Europe but its true color came from Electric Lime

Electric Lime was a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Fiery Orange was a new name used only in Europe but its true color came from Neon Carrot

Fuchsia was a new name and true color

Grass Green was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Forest Green

Glossy Grape was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Granite Gray was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Green Blue was officially retired

Green Sheen was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Hot Magenta was a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Hot Magenta FLUORESCENT was no longer used as a named color but its true color was now named Razzle Dazzle Rose in the USA and Magic Magenta in Europe

Jungle Green was a new name and true color

Laser Lemon was a new named color but its true color came from Chartreuse FLUORESCENT

Lemon Yellow was officially retired

Lilac Luster was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Magic Magenta was a new name used only in Europe but its true color came from Hot Magenta

Magic Mint a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Maize was officially retired

Mandarine Orange was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Orange Red

Misty Moss was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Mystic Maroon was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Neon Carrot was a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Orange Red was officially retired however the true color continued in Mexico as Apple Red

Orange Yellow was officially retired however the true color continued in Mexico as Pineapple Yellow

Outrageous Orange was a new named color but its true color came from Ultra Orange FLUORESCENT

Pearly Purple was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Peppermint Green was a new name used only in Europe but its true color came from Magic Mint

Pewter Blue was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Pineapple Yellow was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Yellow Orange

Pink was reused as a color name but only in Mexico; sharing its true color with Carnation Pink

Polished Pine was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Powerful Purple was a new name used only in Europe but its true color came from Purple Pizzazz

Purple was reused as a color name but only in Mexico; sharing its true color with Violet (purple)

Purple Pizzazz was a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Quick Silver was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Radical Red was a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Raw Umber was officially retired

Razzle Dazzle Rose was a new named color but its true color came from Hot Magenta FLUORESCENT

Red Orange was officially retired however the true color continued in Mexico as Apple Red

Rose Dust was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Royal Purple was a new name and true color

Rusty Red was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Screamin’ Green was a new named color but its true color came from Ultra Green FLUORESCENT

Shadow Blue was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Shiny Shamrock was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Shocking Pink was a new named color but its true color came from Ultra Pink FLUORESCENT

Steel Teal was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Strawberry was a new name used only in Mexico but its true color came from Wild Strawberry

Sugar Plum was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Sunglow was a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Teal Blue was a new name and true color

Twilight Lavender was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

Ultra Blue FLUORESCENT was officially renamed in the USA as Blizzard Blue but this named color continued to be used in Europe

Ultra Green FLUORESCENT was officially renamed in the USA as Screamin’ Green but this named color continued to be used in Europe

Ultra Orange FLUORESCENT was officially renamed in the USA as Outrageous Orange but this named color continued to be used in Europe

Ultra Pink FLUORESCENT was officially renamed in the USA as Shocking Pink but this named color continued to be used in Europe

Ultra Red FLUORESCENT was officially renamed in the USA as Wild Watermelon but this named color continued to be used in Europe

Ultra Yellow FLUORESCENT was officially renamed in the USA as Atomic Tangerine but this named color continued to be used in Europe

Unmellow Yellow was a new name and true color for the fluorescent specialty crayons set

Violet was a not a new name but got used only in Mexico for the true color Blue Violet

Violet Blue was officially retired however the true color continued in Mexico as Blue Purple

Vivid Tangerine was a new name and true color

Wild Strawberry was a new name and true color that was also named Strawberry in Mexico

Wild Watermelon was a new named color but its true color came from Ultra Red FLUORESCENT

Wintergreen Dream was a new name and true color for the Silver Swirls specialty crayons set

 

Thanks to the advent of specialty crayons and the renaming of colors for special uses, this increased our overall named color count an astonishing 60 from 192 to 252 while our true color count jumped 38 from 157 to 195.  Active named colors in use went from 115 to 168 and active true colors rose from 112 to 142.  This year broke all the records for increases.

 

There were no other changes in 1991 and so in terms of assortment sizes, the progression of the largest size offered was now at:

 

1903 – 1910, 30 colors (compliments of the No. 30)

1911 – 1934, 24 colors (compliments of the Rubens-Crayola No. 24)

1935 – 1938, 32 colors (compliments of the No. 332)

1939 – 1944, 52 colors (compliments of the No. 52)

1945 – 1948, 24 colors (compliments of the No. 24,241)

1949 – 1957, 48 colors (compliments of the No. 48)

1958 – 1959, 64 colors (compliments of the No. 64)

1960 – 1991, 72 colors (compliments of the No. 72…which evolved into the 72 Crayon Case)

 

Let’s take a look at the color list at the end of 1991:

 

Named
Color #

True
Color #

 

Color Name

Year

Named

True Color

Year

End

Date


End Reason

All

UC

All

LC

Mix

UC/LC

Other Name Variations on Wrapper


Notes

1

1

Black

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Same color as Kitty Cat Black

1

125

Black

1903

1980

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

2

2

Blue

1903

1903

1935

Switched true colors

Yes

 

Yes

 

True color renamed to Celestial Blue

2

66

Blue

1903

1935

1949

Switched true colors

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

2

70

Blue

1903

1949

 

 

Yes

Yes

 

 

Same color as Birdie Blue

2

117

Blue

1903

1976

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

3

3

Brown

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Same color as Van Dyke Brown, Bunny Brown

4

4

Burnt Sienna

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Bt. Sienna, Burnt-Sienna

 

4

118

Burnt Sienna

1903

1976

 

 

 

Yes

 

bt. sienna

Part of the Fabric specialty set

5

5

Burnt Umber

1903

1903

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

6

6

Celestial Blue

1903

1903

1910

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Only found in No. 51 box

6

2

Celestial Blue

1903

1903

1944

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Reused color name for orig. 1903 Blue color; only found in No. 52 box

7

7

Charcoal Gray

1903

1903

1910

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

Charc Gray

 

8

8

Chrome Green, Dark

1903

1903

1910

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

Chr. Green DK, Ch. Green Dk.

Same color as Green, Dark, Dark Green, Pine Green

9

9

Chrome Green, Light

1903

1903

1935

Discontinued

Yes

 

Yes

Chr Green L, CHR. GREEN L, Chr Green Lt.

Same color as Green, Light

10

10

Chrome Green, Medium

1903

1903

1910

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

Chr. Green M

Same color as Green, Medium; Medium Green

11

11

Chrome Yellow, Light

1903

1903

1910

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Light Yellow

12

12

Chrome Yellow, Medium

1903

1903

1935

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

Chr Yellow Med.

Same color as Yellow, Medium; Medium Yellow; Goldenrod

13

13

Cobalt Blue

1903

1903

1958

Discontinued

Yes

 

Yes

 

Same color as Light Blue; only available in bulk as a named wrapper crayon 1935-1943; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

13

126

Cobalt Blue

1903

1987

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Part of the Canadian Metallic specialty set

14

14

Copper

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Unavailable between 1915 and 1958

14

127

Copper

1903

1987

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Part of the Canadian Metallic specialty set, same color as Copper Penny (Silver Swirls set)

15

15

Dark Blue

1903

1903

1917

Used as other name

Yes

 

No

 

Same color as Prussian Blue, Midnight Blue

16

8

Dark Green

1903

1903

1949

Switched true colors

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Green Dark, Pine Green

16

71

Dark Green

1903

1949

1958

Used as other name

Yes

 

 

 

Same color as Forest Green, Grass Green 

17

16

English Vermillion

1903

1903

1935

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

Eng. Vermillion, Eng. Vermilion

 

18

17

Flesh Tint

1903

1903

1949

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Only available in bulk as a named wrapper crayon starting 1935; Same color as Flesh, Pink Beige, Peach; Not available 1944 due to WWII

19

18

Gold

1903

1903

1953

Switched true colors

 

 

Yes

 

1915-1943 only offered in Bulk; Not available 1944-1952 due to WWII

19

84

Gold

1903

1953

 

 

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

19

128

Gold

1903

1987

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Part of the Canadian Metallic specialty set

20

19

Gold Ochre

1903

1903

1958

Used as other name

Yes

 

Yes

 

Same color as Golden Ochre, Maize

21

19

Golden Ochre

1903

1903

1910

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Gold Ochre, Maize

22

20

Green

1903

1903

1930

Switched true colors

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

22

61

Green

1903

1930

 

 

 

Yes

Yes

 

Same color as Leap Frog Green

22

119

Green

1903

1976

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

23

8

Green, Dark

1903

1903

1914

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Chrome Green, Dark; Dark Green; Pine Green

24

9

Green, Light

1903

1903

1914

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Chrome Green, Light

25

10

Green, Medium

1903

1903

1914

Used as other name

Yes

 

No

Green, Med.,

Same color as Chrome Green, Medium; Medium Green

26

21

Indian Red

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Ind. Red

 

27

11

Lemon Yellow

1903

1903

1910

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Light Yellow.  Only found in No. 51 box

27

38

Lemon Yellow

1903

1903

1990

Officially Retired

Yes

Yes

 

 

Color name reused starting 1958, Same color as second Light Yellow, Fire Fly Yellow

28

14

Light Blue

1903

1903

1917

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Cobalt Blue.   Made exclusively for E.C. Charlton Stores

28

85

Light Blue

1903

1958

1958

Discontinued

Yes

 

 

 

Only available for a small part of 1958

28

120

Light Blue

1903

1976

1980

Discontinued

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

29

11

Light Yellow

1903

1903

1949

Switched true colors

Yes

 

Yes

Yellow Lt.; Lt. Yellow

Same color as Lemon Yellow, second Yellow, Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII;

29

38

Light Yellow

1903

1903

1958

Used as other Name

Yes

 

 

 

Same color as Yellow (true color 38) that it inherited in 1949, second Lemon Yellow, Fire Fly Yellow

30

22

Madder Lake

1903

1903

1935

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

 

31

23

Magenta

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Same color as Permanent Magenta; Not available 1944 due to WWII

32

10

Medium Green

1903

1903

1939

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

Med. Green

Same color as Green, Medium; Chrome Green, Medium; 1935-1939 only avail in long crayon size in No. 99

33

12

Medium Yellow

1903

1903

1958

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

Med. Yellow

Same color as Yellow, Medium; Chrome Yellow, Medium, Goldenrod, Golden Rod; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

34

24

Olive Green

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

35

25

Orange

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Same color as Jack “O” Lantern Orange

35

121

Orange

1903

1976

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

36

26

Permanent Geranium Lake

1903

1903

1910

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

 

37

23

Permanent Magenta

1903

1903

1914

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Magenta

38

27

Pink

1903

1903

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Name not used from 1917-1990 then used from Mexico; same color as Rose Pink, Flamingo Pink, Carnation Pink

49

15

Prussian Blue

1903

1903

1958

Used as other Name

Yes

 

Yes

Prus. Blue

Same color as Dark Blue, Midnight Blue

40

28

Purple

1903

1903

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Name not used from 1914-1990 then used from Mexico; Same color as Violet

41

29

Raw Sienna

1903

1903

1910

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

 

41

86

Raw Sienna

1903

1958

 

 

Yes

Yes

 

 

Name revived 48 years after discontinuing it but with a new true color

42

30

Raw Umber

1903

1903

1990

Officially Retired

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

43

31

Red

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Same color as Candy Apple Red

43

122

Red

1903

1976

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

44

27

Rose Pink

1903

1903

1958

Used as other name

Yes

 

Yes

 

Same color as Pink, Carnation Pink, Flamingo Pink

45

32

Silver

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

1915-1943 offered only as bulk; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

45

129

Silver

1903

1987

 

 

 

 

Yes

 

Part of the Canadian Metallic specialty set

46

33

Ultramarine Blue

1903

1903

1958

Discontinued

Yes

 

Yes

ULT. BLUE; Ult. Blue

Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII; not available 1949-1957

47

3

Van Dyke Brown

1903

1903

1910

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Brown.  Only found in No. 51 box

48

34

Venetian Red

1903

1903

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

Ven. Red

Only available in bulk as a named wrapper crayon from 1935-1937 Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

49

35

Venetian Red, Dark

1903

1903

1910

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

 

50

36

Venetian Red, Light

1903

1903

1910

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

 

51

28

Violet

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Violet (Purple) 

Same color as Purple, Bunch of Grapes Purple; 1949-1957 used another true color but reverted back in 1958

51

72

Violet

1903

1949

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Name only used in Mexico with the same color as Blue Violet.  This was used as Violet in the USA from 1949 to 1958 before Violet revered back to its original true color.

51

123

Violet

1903

1976

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

52

37

White

1903

1903

 

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

53

38

Yellow

1903

1903

1949

Switched true colors

Yes

 

Yes

 

Same color as Light Yellow (second one)

53

48

Yellow

1903

1926

 

 

Yes

Yes

 

 

Same color as Maximum Yellow, Sunshine Yellow

53

124

Yellow

1903

1976

 

 

 

Yes

 

 

Part of the Fabric specialty set

54

12

Yellow Medium

1903

1903

1914

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Same color as Chrome Yellow, Medium; Medium Yellow

55

9

Light Green

1910

1910

1949

Switched true colors

 

 

Yes

Lt. Green

Same color as Chrome Green, Light; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

55

73

Light Green

1910

1949

1958

Used as other name

Yes

 

 

 

Same color as Sea Green

56

39

Maximum Black

1926

1926

1935

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935

57

40

Maximum Blue

1926

1926

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

58

41

Maximum Blue Green

1926

1926

1949

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

Maximum Blue-Green

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Same color as Blue Green; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

59

42

Maximum Green

1926

1926

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

60

43

Maximum Green Yellow

1926

1926

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

Maximum Green-Yellow

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

61

44

Maximum Purple

1926

1926

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

62

45

Maximum Purple Blue

1926

1926

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

Maximum Purple-Blue

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

63

46

Maximum Red

1926

1926

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

 

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

64

47

Maximum Red Purple

1926

1926

1949

Discontinued

 

 

Yes

Maxmimum Red-Purple

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

65

48

Maximum Yellow

1926

1926

1949

Used as other name

 

 

Yes

 

Munsell wrappers used prior to 1935; Same color as Gamboge Yellow, Yellow (second one); Not available 1944-1948 due to WWII

66

49

Maximum Yellow Red

1926

1926

1949